Magdalen College: From the Summit
“It is like the difference between filet mignon and cardboard.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 3)

“It is like the difference between filet mignon and cardboard.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 3)

December 16, 2019

A conversation with Anthony Esolen about the vibrancy and life-giving power of the classroom and the hope that today's Catholic students can give us for the future of the Church and society.  Dr. Esolen also discusses and reads two lyrics from his poem, "The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord" (16 and 29), considers the diversity of blessedness, and suggests New Jersey's role in inspiring Dante's great poem.

 

 

Links of potential interest:

The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord by Anthony Esolen

Magdalen College of the Liberal Arts

Mary Mumbach: “The Urgency of Liberal Education”

Mary Mumbach: “The Urgency of Liberal Education”

December 16, 2019

A conversation with Mary Mumbach, a senior member of the college's faculty and Dean emerita, about the urgency of liberal education.  Throughout the conversation she considers the nature of liberal education and teaching while reflecting on her own teachers.  She also considers how the teacher, the curriculum, classic books, and the concept of paideia cohere and are ordered to a transcendent purpose within her vision of liberal education. 

Mumbach's "The courage of reason and the scandal of education" in Gained Horizons: Regensburg and the Enlargement of Reason

Magdalen College of the Liberal Arts

“We can’t get through the day without telling a lie to ourselves.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 2)

“We can’t get through the day without telling a lie to ourselves.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 2)

December 16, 2019

A conversation with Anthony Esolen about Sigrid Undset and how her life and work teach us not only about the past and ourselves but also how it indicates a way forward in our current moment.  He also takes up the categories of Catholic literature and overlooked authors such as Henryk Sienkiewicz.  Esolen concludes by discussing and reading a dramatic monologue from his poem, "The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord" (Bartimaeus) and reflects on the forgotten purpose of poetry and art.

 

 

The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord by Anthony Esolen

Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset

Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero by Henryk Sienkiewicz

Magdalen College of the Liberal Arts

“It is broken metrically to describe a civilization in rubble.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 1)

“It is broken metrically to describe a civilization in rubble.” (Anthony Esolen Episode 1)

December 16, 2019

"To heck with college professors," he says halfway through.  In this conversation, Anthony Esolen discusses reading and teaching Whitman and Eliot and considers the paradox of classically trained revolutionaries in the arts.  Dr. Esolen also introduces and discusses his poem The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord and reads a hymn from that poem (17). Be sure not to miss his impersonation of Marlon Brando.

Links of potential interest:

The Hundredfold: Songs for the Lord by Anthony Esolen

T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland

"Theology After the Revolution"  by R.R. Reno

Magdalen College of the Liberal Arts

Peter Sampo: “Making visible the invisible realities of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.”

Peter Sampo: “Making visible the invisible realities of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.”

December 8, 2019

With "Good afternoon, my fellow Americans," Dr. Peter Sampo, the college’s founding president, begins this address on the occasion of the college's forty-first commencement exercises at which he received an honorary degree.  In this address Dr. Sampo considers the extraordinary education the college offers within the broader landscape of contemporary culture, concluding with a call to live lives of extraordinary courage.

Links of potential interest:

Peter Sampo on "Paideia"

Magdalen College of the Liberal Arts

 

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